Distinguishing C-End Design from B-End Design

2023-05-19 10:00:00
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Summary : C-End design and B-End design exhibit notable disparities in their approaches and considerations. While C-End design primarily caters to the consumer market, B-End design focuses on meeting the specific needs of enterprises. This article aims to shed light on the key differences between these two design approaches, exploring their distinct characteristics and considerations. By understanding these disparities, designers can effectively navigate the requirements of each market segment and deliver tailored design solutions.

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Since the advent of the Internet, we have witnessed the emergence of remarkable products like Taobao-WeChat and the 2008 phenomenon, Pinduoduo. However, no product of similar magnitude has surfaced since then. Numerous factors contribute to this phenomenon. For instance, the user base on the Internet has reached its pinnacle, leaving little room for further expansion. Consequently, stock prices have plateaued, and investment has dwindled.


Distinguishing themselves from their counterparts in the C-end market, users in the B-end market possess distinct priorities, emphasizing product efficiency, stability, and security. Therefore, I will draw from my personal experience to provide insights in this regard.

I. Changes from C-end design to B-end design

1. Understanding the B-end Market

Initially, gaining an understanding of the B-end market's characteristics and requirements is essential. Unlike the C-end market, the B-end market necessitates tailored solutions to meet enterprise-specific needs. Therefore, comprehending the demands and challenges of diverse industries and enterprises becomes crucial to providing optimal solutions. Additionally, one must grasp the B-end market's business processes and regulations, such as B-end sales, procurement, and supply chain management.

2. Embracing Enterprise Software Design

B-end market products typically revolve around software or platforms, necessitating familiarity with corporate software design. This entails comprehending the architecture, functionality, and interface design of enterprise software. Unlike C-end design, B-end design places greater emphasis on functionality and efficiency, as corporate users often tackle a substantial volume of work tasks. Hence, one must understand how to craft high-efficiency user interfaces and workflows to enhance user productivity.

3. Exploring Usability Testing and User Research

While C-end design typically involves usability testing and user research to grasp user preferences, B-end design focuses more on understanding user workflows and work-related requirements. Consequently, when designing B-end products, one must delve into designing effective user testing and research methodologies to gain deeper insights into user needs and create superior products.

4. Mastering Customer Communication

In B-end design, effective communication with customers is crucial for comprehending their needs and ideas. Unlike the C-end market, B-end customers usually consist of corporate executives and business personnel, each with distinct product requirements and expectations. Consequently, one must learn how to engage with corporate executives and business personnel, gathering their feedback and suggestions to translate them into practical design solutions.

II. Recommended Designer Profiles for Transitioning to B-end Design

Transitioning from C-end design to B-end design requires specific considerations. B-end design often involves working on similar types of pages, such as table and form optimizations, with fewer opportunities for creating new elements daily. For designers aiming to make this transition, I recommend the following profiles:

1. Interactive Design Specialists

B-end design places a higher emphasis on interaction compared to visual aesthetics. Three key elements extensively studied in B-end design are:

  • Users
  • Products (items)
  • Fields

Each of these elements possesses distinct business attributes. Designers need to contemplate the behavioral logic of different users in various scenarios and identify the objectives behind user actions.

2. Business-Focused Designers

C-end design primarily concentrates on the consumer end, where captivating visuals can enhance product revenue to a certain extent. However, in the B-end market, the focus lies in comprehending business scenarios, and an excessive emphasis on visuals may impede user operations. Designers should engage in comprehensive business research, analyzing information about competitors and acquiring the knowledge necessary to support their design decisions.

III. Preparations Required for Transition

1. Acquire Product Knowledge

A solid grasp of product knowledge is crucial in B-end design. Designers must understand the target audience, competitors, and market trends associated with the products or services in question. This knowledge enables them to provide targeted and effective design solutions.

2. Gain Familiarity with the B-end Market

Comprehending the characteristics and needs of the B-end market is paramount. Unlike the C-end market, the B-end market necessitates customized solutions tailored to meet specific enterprise requirements. Consequently, designers must understand the diverse needs and challenges encountered across various industries and enterprises to offer optimal solutions. Additionally, acquiring knowledge about the business processes and regulations prevalent in the B-end market, such as B-end sales, procurement, and supply chain management, is essential.

3. Learn Enterprise Software Design

As B-end market products primarily revolve around software or platforms, familiarity with corporate software design becomes imperative. This entails understanding the architecture, functionality, and interface design of enterprise software. Unlike C-end design, B-end design places greater emphasis on functionality and efficiency, as corporate users often face a substantial workload. Therefore, designers need to master the art of designing high-efficiency user interfaces and workflows to enhance user productivity.

4. Conduct Research on Usability Testing and User Research

While usability testing and user research in C-end design predominantly focus on understanding user preferences, B-end design prioritizes comprehending user workflows and work-related needs. Consequently, designers embarking on B-end product design must study effective methodologies for conducting user testing and research. These approaches aid in gaining a deeper understanding of user needs and ultimately designing superior products.

5. Develop Effective Customer Communication Skills

In B-end design, effective communication with customers is vital for understanding their needs and ideas. Unlike the C-end market, B-end customers primarily consist of corporate executives and business personnel, who possess different requirements and expectations for products. Consequently, designers must acquire the ability to communicate with corporate executives and business personnel, gathering their feedback and suggestions to translate them into tangible design solutions.

6. Cultivate a Positive Mindset

The transition from C-end to B-end design encompasses significant differences. For unfamiliar business aspects, designers can learn from product peers and other professionals to expand their knowledge and expertise.

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